Restock your backlog with Square Enix games this Prime Day

Square Enix is a very busy company. The publisher has spent the last few years churning out everything from Final Fantasy games to completely new franchises. That was especially true in 2022 and it’s already carried over into 2023 thanks to releases like Final Fantasy XVI, Forspoken, and Octopath Traveler 2. Even diehard fans of the publisher’s output may not have gotten around to everything it released in the last 12 months.

If you’re in that boat, I’ve got some good news. A major chunk of Square Enix’s recent game catalog is currently on sale for Prime Day. That includes a wide selection of titles from The Diofield Chronicle to Star Ocean: The Divine Force. Not only that, but the sale even includes discounts on most of the company’s 2023 games, including the best RPG of the year.

If you’re looking to freshen up your backlog, here are six great deals we found while combing through today’s deals. It’s an especially great “reading list” for players who have already finished Final Fantasy XVI and are just biding their time until Final Fantasy VII Rebirth now.

Octopath Traveler 2 — $40

Octopath Traveler 2 BP system
Square Enix

Did the action-focused Final Fantasy XVI leave you hungry for a more traditional RPG? Then you need to give Octopath Traveler 2 a try. Released earlier this year, Square Enix’s retro-inspired adventure isn’t just a nostalgic throwback to classic turn-based games, but the best pound-for-pound RPG of the year. Like its predecessor, Octopath Traveler 2 puts players in control of eight disparate characters whose paths all intersect. The sequel does a much better job of tying those eight tales together with even more party interaction, addressing one of the most common complaints fans had with the original Octopath Traveler. And, of course, it’s all presented in the series’ signature HD-2D style, bringing its vast world together with gorgeously detailed pixel art.

Forspoken — $45

Frey using magic in Forspoken.
Square Enix

Forspoken got a bad rap when it launched earlier this year. The action-RPG quickly became a laughing stock on social media as players posted clips of its “cringe” dialogue, likening its tone to that of a Marvel movie. Those critiques were fair, but they also papered over the fact that Forspoken is a much better adventure than you’d think. That’s largely thanks to its excellent open-world traversal, which has players fluidly dashing around environments using parkour magic — it almost feels like a Sonic the Hedgehog game at times. Its combat system isn’t too far off from Final Fantasy XVI’s either, so if you liked that game and want a little more spectacle, it’s worth grabbing it at a discount this Prime Day.

Theatrhythm Final Bar Line — $40

A fight from Final Fantasy XV is recreated in Theatrhythm Final Bar Line.
Square Enix

I’m not being ironic when I say that Theatrhythm Final Bar Line is my favorite Final Fantasy game in three years. The rhythm game acts as a tribute to the franchise’s entire history, letting players tap along to the sounds of the series. That may not sound too exciting on paper, but what makes that work is Final Fantasy’s very long history. As you play along to 35 years worth of music, you get to see just how far video game music has come in that time. What starts as a collection of simple bleeps evolves with each passing year until it reaches Final Fantasy VII Remake’s enormous orchestral score. Even if you don’t care for the RPG series, Theatrhythm is an extraordinary historical document for video game fans who want to study the medium’s evolution.

Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin — $20

Jack fights with the Samurai Job in Stranger of Paradise Final Fantasy Origin.
Square Enix

From the moment it was first announced, Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin gained a reputation as a “meme game.” Fans cracked up at its absurd debut trailer, where its one-track-minded hero, Jack Garland, repeatedly explained that his goal is to kill chaos. Stranger of Paradise isn’t a joke, though; it’s a solid action RPG with quite a bit of meaning behind its unintentional comedy. Like Final Fantasy VII Remake, it almost plays like a meta-commentary of Final Fantasy at large. It’s a chaotic game about irs creators struggling to define what Final Fantasy even means anymore, a discussion that would set the stage for Final Fantasy XVI one year later. If you laughed it off in 2022, it might be a great time to revisit it now.

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion — $40

Zack slashes an enemy in Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion.
Square Enix

If you’re looking to kill some time before Final Fantasy VII Rebirth launches (on two discs!) next year, Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion may just be the game you’re looking for. The PSP remake gives Final Fantasy VII’s prequel new life by giving it a much-needed graphical update and combat system tweaks. While it doesn’t do much to tie into Final Fantasy VII Remake’s reimagined story, it does at least serve as a great introduction to Zack, who appears to play a major role in Rebirth. With its discount for Prime Day, it’s as good a time as ever to learn about what happened before Cloud picked up the Buster Sword.

Dragon Quest Treasures — $40

A player runs with monsters in Dragon Quest Treasures.
Square Enix

Last year, Square Enix put out a ton of releases that just slipped under the radar. The list included intriguing new franchises like The Diofield Chronicle and Harvestella. One of its most under-the-radar releases, though, was a charming little Dragon Quest spinoff that’s worth checking out at a discount. Dragon Quest Treasures is a kid-friendly exploration game that has players digging for treasures and collecting the series’ classic enemies like Pokémon. While it’s not the deepest experience, there’s a satisfying gameplay loop in here for anyone that wants a laid-back adventure full of nostalgic references to the RPG series’ past. It’s a breezy little game that’s a perfect choice for anyone’s summer vacation plans.

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